Astronomy Finally, the mystery of the origin of one of the mysterious flashes of the FRB was solved

Could another cosmic puzzle be solved? We are definitely on the right track, although modern technology will not allow us to check some new tracks.

FRB, i.e. fast radio burst or extragalactic fast radio transient, i.e. short-lived, several-millisecond radio signals of extragalactic origin, is one of the greatest mysteries of the space age of human exploration. They reach us from all parts of the galaxy, and so far no one has been able to determine what mechanism is responsible for it and where it came from. Of course, according to advocates of the theory of alien civilizations, their technology is behind them, but scientists are more inclined towards the hypothesis that FRB is responsible for the stars located in our Galaxy.

The first FRB signal was discovered in 2007 during the analysis of archival observational data, and the characteristics of this 5-millisecond signal with a 30-janky intensity stream suggested that it came from outside of our galaxy. This is indicated by the analysis of radio waves, from which it appears that the signal had to pass through significant concentrations of electrons on the way to the Earth, that is, it must come from a large distance and a very strong source. Interestingly, although this first FRB was single, and we have so far managed to register a total of 85, some researchers believe that up to ten thousand can be created every day.

Now we learn that a group of scientists has finally managed to trace the path of one of the signals and with an extremely precise determination of its origin … from a galaxy away from us by billions of light years. Speech on FRB, symbol 180924, which has been able to register the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), originating from the Galaxy of the size of the Milky Way named by scientists DES J214425.25-405400.81, which is away from us by exactly 3.6 billion years light.

What’s even more fascinating, researchers have even pointed out a specific point in this galaxy, in its “suburbs”, 13,000 light-years distant from the center. It is also known that it is a huge galaxy that does not create new stars anymore, and astronomers are full of hope that now they can learn more about her environment and find tips on what really causes FRB. In short, we know more than before, but we will have to wait a long time for answers to some of the questions.